salary

Eight items to leave off your resume

March 30, 2012 Resumes 9 comments , , , , , ,

Here’s a quick list of things that should never appear on your resume. Unfortunately, I see them all the time.

A photo
unless you’re applying for a position as a model or actor.
A list of references
You’ll be asked for them at the right point in the process. If you want the company to be impressed by who you know or who you’ve worked with, then put that in the cover letter.
“References available upon request”
This is assumed. The reader will not think “This guy has no references available, so toss his resume.”
An objective
Objectives are summaries of what you want to get from the company. It doesn’t make sense to start selling yourself by telling the reader what you hope to get out of him. Replace your objective with a 3-4 bullet summary of the rest of the resume. (See more posts about objectives)
Salary information
Disclosing your salary history weakens your position when negotiating a salary. It’s also irrelevant on your resume.
An unprofessional email address
Email accounts are free from Gmail, so there’s no reason to use your “cubs_fan_1969@yourisp.com” account for professional correspondence.
Meaningless self-assessments like “I’m a hard worker” or “I work well on a team.”
Everyone says those things, so they have no meaning. Instead, the bullets for each position on your resume should give examples and evidence of these assertions. (See more posts about self-assessments)
Hobbies that don’t relate to the job
Everyone likes to read and listen to music and spend time with their families. Exception is if the hobby somehow ties to the job or company. If you play guitar and you’re applying to be an accountant for Guitar Center’s corporate office, then mention that you play, even though your job won’t involve guitar-playing directly.

What else do you see on resumes that should never be there?

No, you can’t ask about money in the job interview

August 2, 2011 Interviews 6 comments , ,

So often I see it posted to reddit: “When do I ask about money?” You don’t. You don’t ask about money in the job interview. You wait until the company brings it up, often in the form of a job offer. There’s a time and a place for everything, and the time and place for compensation discussion is in the job offer, or when the company chooses to bring it up.

When you go into a job interview, your focus must be on the company’s needs, or what work the hiring manager wants you to do. You want to talk about what you can do for the company, not ask about what they can do for you. Asking about salary, benefits, vacation, or other forms of compensation tells the interviewer that you’re more concerned with what’s in it for you, rather than how you can help her. Whether that’s true or not doesn’t matter. You still run a risk of coming across that way.

(This is also part of why an objective is the worst way to start a résumé, because it says “Hi, I’m so-and-so, and here’s what I want from you.”)

The goal of a job interview is for you to get a job offer, or to move closer to getting one. If you don’t get the job offer, it doesn’t matter how much the job pays.

An interview isn’t a one-sided affair, of course. It’s also about you finding out about the company, about worklife, about the sorts of projects you’d work on, because these all fit into things of benefit to the company. Compensation, however, is a one-way benefit to you. What if the interviewer doesn’t discuss salary? Then you just wait for the second interview or the job offer, where the specifics of compensation will all be laid out.

People have countered my stance on this with “I just want to know what it’s paying so that I can save time for both of us by not going through an interview for a job that’s not going to pay enough.” That’s what we programmers refer to as a premature optimization. Just as it doesn’t matter how fast your program runs if it gives the wrong answer, it doesn’t matter how quickly you get through the hiring process if you don’t get the offer.

Have some patience. Focus on selling your skills and experience to the interviewer. Talk to the interviewer about her problems and how you’ll solve them. And don’t ask about compensation.