Steve Jobs

You’re not a genius? Says who?

October 10, 2011 Open source, People, Social 2 comments , , , , ,

Who says you’re not a genius?  Who are any of us to say?  And why would anyone bother telling someone that?

In my last blog post, I talked about how it was unnecessary and counterproductive to justify your projects to your detractors. It only wastes time that could be spent doing something positive, and it’s not going to change anyone’s mind.  One of the commenters took issue with my premise, basing his disagreement on the glib comment “You ain’t Steve Jobs.”

Of course I’m not, but so what? How much of a genius do I have to be before I no longer have to justify myself to others? (Don’t answer that; it only encourages them.)

The unspoken corollary to comments like “You ain’t Steve Jobs” seems to be “Therefore, you must listen to how others want you to be.” Fortunately, even in the absence of a Jobs-level genius, we’re all able to stand on our own, to live and work as we see fit, without having to take mandatory guidance from others.

I wonder at the thought process that it takes to tell someone “You’re not as _____ as you think you are.”  Near as I can figure, comments like these have one or more of these subtexts:

  • “You need to be more like me.”
  • “I’m trying to save you wasting time or risking failure.”
  • “I have taken it upon myself to take you down a peg and put you in your place.”  (This one often appears with the phrase “I’m just saying…”)

Fortunately, none of these are valid, none of them need concern you.  You can, and should, ignore them.  Ignore them for your own sake, and for the sake of the awesome things you have in you to share with the world.

I wonder how many Jobs-level brains are out there but never flower because the person was told too many times that he (or more likely, she) isn’t as good as he thinks he is. Neil deGrasse Tyson makes a brilliant point about how we teach children, that parents spend the first years of a child’s life teaching him to walk and talk, and the rest of his life telling him to shut up and sit down, quashing their sense of wonder and thirst for knowledge. “You ain’t Steve Jobs” is the adult version of “shut up and sit down.”

Whatever your level of genius, one thing we can all share with Steve is his perseverance.  He kept working at what he believed in, despite public derision about his public failures.  Before the success of the Macintosh, Apple released the Lisa, and before the iPad, the Newton. How much poorer the world would be if Jobs had listened to his critics and packed it in!

I’m not saying that there isn’t value to be found in criticism, even unsolicited criticism, about your work.  I’m not suggesting that you shut out the world around you.  If you can take what you find useful and leave the rest, then do it.

I am suggesting that you shut out those who tell you you’re no good, or who want to put you in your place. When people tell you you’re not awesome, ignore them.  Who are they to say?  And why does it matter if they think you’re awesome or not?  Eventually, you’ll prove them wrong.

 

There’s only one useful way to handle your detractors

October 6, 2011 Open source, People, Social 8 comments , , ,

Here’s a Reddit/Slashdot/whatever thread that never happened:

Internet crank on Reddit: “Hey, Steve Jobs, I guess that new iPad looks cool, but I think iPad is a stupid name, it makes me think of sanitary napkins.”

Steve: “Yeah, well, here’s why we called it that. (Long explanation justifying his choices)”

Crank #2: “Well, why didn’t you call it the iTablet? I think that would have been a good name. What does everyone else think?”

Crank #3: “What does it have to be iAnything? I’m tired of the i- prefix.”

Steve: “We thought about that, but … (More explanation about his choices)”

Crank #1: “And really, isn’t it just a bigger iPod Touch? I would never carry that around with me. And come on, you’re just trying to redo the Newton anyway LOL”

Steve: “My logic behind the iPad is (vision, business plan, blah blah blah)”

Can you even  imagine Steve Jobs in this sort of time-wasting and emotionally draining tit-for-tat in a thread on Slashdot? On reddit? In some blog’s comment section? Of course not. Justification of his plans would take away from the amazing things that he needed to achieve.

Naysayers are part of every project. How many people do you think pissed on Jimmy Wales’ little project to aggregate knowledge? Nobody’s going to spend their time writing encyclopedia entries! And yet there it is.  On a personal level, if I listened to everyone who thought I was wasting my time improving on find + grep you’d never have ack.

We all have to persevere in the face of adversity to ideas, but there’s more than that.  We need to ignore our detractors. Despite how silly and time-wasting it is to argue your motivations and reasons for undertaking a project, many of us feel compelled to argue with everyone who disagrees with us.  I suggest you not waste your time.

On the Internet, the attitude is “Why wasn’t I consulted?” Every anti-social child (measured by calendar or maturity) with a keyboard thinks it’s his responsibility to piss on everything he doesn’t like. They’ll be there always. You can no more make them go away than you would by arguing with the rain.

What are you hoping to achieve by arguing with someone who doesn’t like your project? Do you expect that he’ll come around to your way of thinking? It won’t happen through words.

Not only does arguing with your critics waste your precious time, but it tells them, and every other crank reading, that you’re willing to engage in debate about what you’re doing. Don’t encourage them! Let them find a more receptive target.

I’m not saying that factual misstatements need to be ignored.  If something is provably incorrect, go ahead and counter it with facts.  However, most of the time these message thread pissing wars get down to “I would not be doing what you are doing, and therefore you are wrong for doing so.”

The only thing that has a chance of silencing your critics is success at what you do. Arguing with the naysayers doesn’t get you any closer to that.

“The only way to do great work is to love what you do.”

October 6, 2011 Career No comments ,

As most everyone who knows me knows, I wrote a book called Land the Tech Job You Love. The word “love” is in the title very specifically. As I discussed with my editors at Pragmatic what we’d title the book, the one point on which I was adamant was that “love” had to be in the title. I didn’t want you to find a job you liked, or tolerated, but one that you loved. I wanted “job you love” to be a constant reminder to the reader.

Every so often, either in person or in an online forum, someone will make a snarky comment along the lines of “Work sucks, work is supposed to suck, why fool yourself into thinking that you’ll ever enjoy going to work in the morning?” I always answer yes, I do believe that it’s possible to get a job you love, and if you’re not in one now, then you can find the next one that you do love, or you can work to make your current job into one you love.

And if you don’t believe me, perhaps you’ll believe our dearly departed Steve Jobs, from his
commencement address to Stanford in 2005:

You’ve got to find what you love. And that is as true for your work as it is for your lovers. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do.

If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. And don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on. So keep looking. Don’t settle.

The other drum that I keep beating is “Life is too short to spend in a crappy job.” Steve agrees.

For the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” And whenever the answer has been “No” for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.

Please, if you’re in a job you don’t like, change it. Change the job, or change jobs. If you’re stuck in the job because of the crappy job market, then at least make a little change in that direction. Start a side project that scratches an itch. Release it to the world. Do something awesome and spread it around.

As Steve said, quoted here: “Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn’t matter to me. Going to bed at night saying we’ve done something wonderful… that’s what matters to me.”

Thanks for everything, Steve.