numbers

How do I make my resume stand out?

November 29, 2011 Job hunting 2 comments , ,

All the time I hear people asking “How do I make my resume stand out?” It’s a great question to ask, because your resume is one of dozens or hundreds of others. The problem isn’t that you want your resume to get noticed, but that you want the reader to be interested in what you say and call you in for an interview. How do you do that?

Remove fluff

Do you have an objective? Don’t. It’s filled with meaningless fluff. “I want to leverage my skills to add value to the bottom line of a forward-thinking blah blah blah bullshit bullshit bullshit.” That says nothing other than “I want this job.” No kidding. Never use an objective.

Do you make meaningless claims like “Excellent written and verbal communication skills.” Crap. It means nothing. Anyone can say that. Give just the facts, not your own assessments. “Excellent written and verbal communication skills” is not a fact. It is an opinion, a self-assessment. Leave it off.

Those are all vague, meaningless generalities. Give details!

Add numbers and other details

Use numbers in everything you can. Numbers draw the eye and give detail. You should have at least one number on every bullet line in your resume.

Let me repeat: Every bullet point in your resume should have a number that gives size of the job.

Instead of saying “Worked on the help desk, answering user questions” you say you “Worked on the help desk, answering an average of 30 user questions per day.”

“Proficient with MS Office, Windows suite and all around tech savvy” is hopelessly vague and uninspiring. Tech savvy according to who? Your grandma? Oooh, you know Windows. So does my dog, and he died six years ago.

Now, if you’ve done amazing presentations in PowerPoint, then say that. “Created three presentations in PowerPoint in a year for area sales directors.” That says much more than “I know Office.”

Remove fluff. Add numbers and details. That’s 90% of the battle right there. If you can do that well, you’re ahead of the pack.

Looking for ideas on how to add details to your bullet points? Post them in the comments and I’ll see if I can help.

Track your professional stats like a pro athlete to give your resume power

November 14, 2011 Job hunting 1 comment , , ,

Let’s say that you’re Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler and you’ve got to submit a resume to the next team you want to play for. If he wrote a resume like most resumes I see, he’d write something like this:

Chicago Bears, 2009-current
Quarterback

  • Responsible for directing on-field offense of professional football team.
  • Called plays, led huddles before each play.
  • Play-to-play responsibilities include handing ball to running back, throwing passes, and running with ball as necessary.

Hardly inspiring, is it? It tells what his job responsibilities were, but not what he actually achieved. Let’s rewrite some of those bullets with some of his statistics.

  • Lead Bears offense to 11-5 season, and to the NFC championship game in the postseason.
  • In 2010, threw for 7.58 yard passing average with a 60.4 completion average.
  • etc etc etc

See how the second resume is focused on results, not responsibilities? Your resume should be thought out the same way. When you talk about results, you need numbers to tell the story. Plus, numbers draw the eye and give your resume the detail that makes it interesting.

“But Andy,” I hear you saying, “we’re just humble programmers and graphic designers and system administrators. We don’t have the collective power of the NFL stats keepers keeping track of all this for us!” Indeed you don’t, which is why you have to do it yourself.

Start keeping track of your own stats. Start today and look around you. Think about “how many” for all the things that are part of your workday, and put them on your resume. (You ARE keeping your resume current, right?)

  • How many people on your team?
  • How many lines of code in the codebase?
  • How many users use your software?
  • How many users on your network? How many servers? How much storage?
  • How many support calls do you take per day? Per week?
  • How much money has your work saved the company?
  • etc etc etc

Your goal should be to have at least one number in each bullet point, supporting the story that the text tells.

So few resumes have any sort of numbers or statistics on them, you’ll put your resume ahead of 90% of the other applicants’ resumes.

Credit for this way of thinking about resumes goes to Rich Stone, in his blog post Resume and Interview Preparation Tips. Thanks, Rich!

Resume tactics from the grocery checkout lane

August 6, 2009 Job hunting, Resumes 3 comments , ,

Next time you’re at the grocery store checkout lane, take a look at the women’s magazines and see what they do to get you to read them. There’s a valuable lesson there for your resume.


Magazine covers

There’s always a blurb on the front for an article inside that offers a specific number of items inside. They’re of a form like:

  • 17 hottest celebrity couples
  • 23 ways to keep your man happy
  • 37 quick and easy meals for summer
  • 684 new looks for under $100

The magazines’ editors know that numbers attract attention. If you’re like me, those numbers may be the first thing you notice after the cover photo. The numbers also promise a level of service. It’s not just “an article about celebrity couples,” but a promise of seventeen of them.

You should use this approach on your resume as well.

First, we know that numbers attract attention. When scanning your resume, the reader’s eye will be drawn to the numbers naturally.

Moreover, numbers make your story more interesting and give the reader a sense of the size of your accomplishments, or the troubles you’ve solved in the past.

Consider the difference between these two bullets:

  • Ran the help desk. Answered trouble tickets, responded to phone calls and tracked spare computer parts.
  • Ran the help desk for 200-seat office. Staff of 3 answered average of 50 phone calls and 27 trouble tickets per day. Maintained 200-unit inventory of spare computer parts worth $10,000.

These two bullets describe exactly the same responsibilities, but the addition of specific numbers draw the attention of the reader, and add the details that give a much fuller picture of your responsibilities.

Without the numbers, the reader might also logically assume that the reality is more like this:

  • Ran the “help desk” in a four-person real estate office. Answered questions a few times a week about Excel. Kept a spare PC in a closet in case something tanked.

Remember, your awesomeness is not self-evident, and part of your job in telling the story of your awesomeness is giving the numbers to support it.

For more on the power of numbers, see chapter 3, “Résumé Content: Getting The Words Down” in Land The Tech Job You Love.