LinkedIn

Where to find me online

October 4, 2011 Internet, Social No comments , , , , , , , , , , ,

Although I mostly write to my blog and my Twitter feed, here’s a dump of most of my online presences.

petdance.com
My blog is where I post about technology and job hunting and careers.
@petdance on Twitter
My main outlet for posting short thoughts and links to interesting stuff. (I try not to engage in conversation on Twitter, because I think it’s annoying for everyone but the two people involved in the conversation.) If you were following @theworkinggeek or @techworklove on Twitter, switch to @petdance.
Perlbuzz
Perl news and the occasional original article. Most of the blog traffic is a weekly recap of the news bits posted to the @perlbuzz Twitter feed.
Facebook
I’ve whittled down my Facebook friend roster to mostly friends and family and people I know in day-to-day life. I’ve found that I’m not interested in the day-to-day lives of people I only know from the world of open source. Therefore, most of the friend requests I get from people I only know online get ignored.
Google+
I’m not sure how I’m going to wind up using Google+. Mostly I’ve been posting longer-form blurbs or embedding media.
Slideshare and Speakerdeck
I’ve always been posting slides of my talks on Slideshare, but Speakerdeck has just popped up and I like their interface much more, so I’ve put some content there, too. Look for Speakerdeck to gain more traction in the programming community.
LinkedIn
I have yet to have anything useful come out of LinkedIn, but I maintain a network there as well. My rule for adding someone as a contact on LinkedIn is that it has to be someone with whom I’ve actually worked on a project.
Github
Github is where I host most of my open source projects. Love love love.
Flickr and twitpic
I’m not at all a photographer, but there you go.

Did I forget one? Leave me a comment.

You can’t take the easy way to writing a résumé

January 10, 2011 Job hunting 6 comments ,

I came across a horrifying thread at Hacker News: Can I use a LinkedIn profile instead of resume for my job applications? It’s a reasonable question, and the answer is “No, you cannot use a LinkedIn profile instead of a résumé.”  If the job ad asks for a résumé, then you give them a résumé.  If they want the résumé in Word format, you give them the résumé in Word format.  What the hiring company asks for, you give them.

What makes me shake my head in dismay is the number of people who replied to say “Oh, yeah, just give ’em a LinkedIn URL instead, they can forward that around.”  The people who act this way are likely to not get interviews. These people who want to modify the process, let’s call them the IKBs, for “I Know Better.” Here are some things they need to learn.

First, if the company has gone through the trouble of writing an ad, they probably have a pretty good idea of what they want as a hiring process.  If the people doing the hiring didn’t think it was important what got sent in, then they wouldn’t have specified. But they did, so it does.  The IKBs don’t just get to decide from their easy chairs that they know a better way, at least not if they want a job.

Second, the IKBs aren’t somehow smarter than the people doing the hiring. Comments in the Hacker News thread include self-delusional drivel like “people cling to tradition for irrational reasons.”  This is the way the IKBs say “I know better than others how they should run their business.”  They are fooling themselves.  It sounds good when you tell yourself that, but the hiring company will simply ignore you.

Third, LinkedIn is not a substitute for a résumé, because LinkedIn’s format might not be the best way to present the story of you.  There is precious little space for the details and stories that make your résumé compelling to the reader.  Further, every résumé you send out must be tailored to the job for which you’re applying.  You cannot customize your LinkedIn profile for each company.  Maybe when applying to one company, you emphasize the work you’ve done in Oracle, and to another it’s all about the Linux sysadmin, depending on what the company wants.

Some posters on the thread mentioned that LinkedIn has a “résumé builder.”  All that does is reformat the fields already in your LinkedIn profile into various different résumé formats.  However, it doesn’t take into account the hard thinking and preparation that it takes to create a compelling résumé. Don’t get suckered into it. These résumé building websites are worse than worthless because they pretend that a good résumé is about the formatting.  It’s not.

Most of all, what makes me weep for the IKBs is that they think they’ve found an easy way to get a job.  Just fill in a few blanks, send off an email, and the hiring managers will fall over themselves to snap up the candidate.   It doesn’t work that way.  Finding a job, especially one that you’re going to want to go to every day, takes hard work.  If you think that you’ve got an easy time firing off résumés to companies, then you’re not trying hard enough.

Go ahead and be an IKB.  Take the easy way to writing a résumé.  Just don’t expect any interviews.  Those interviews will go to the candidates who have applied themselves and done the hard work necessary to present themselves in the best possible light to the company.