Social

You’re not a genius? Says who?

October 10, 2011 Open source, People, Social 2 comments , , , , ,

Who says you’re not a genius?  Who are any of us to say?  And why would anyone bother telling someone that?

In my last blog post, I talked about how it was unnecessary and counterproductive to justify your projects to your detractors. It only wastes time that could be spent doing something positive, and it’s not going to change anyone’s mind.  One of the commenters took issue with my premise, basing his disagreement on the glib comment “You ain’t Steve Jobs.”

Of course I’m not, but so what? How much of a genius do I have to be before I no longer have to justify myself to others? (Don’t answer that; it only encourages them.)

The unspoken corollary to comments like “You ain’t Steve Jobs” seems to be “Therefore, you must listen to how others want you to be.” Fortunately, even in the absence of a Jobs-level genius, we’re all able to stand on our own, to live and work as we see fit, without having to take mandatory guidance from others.

I wonder at the thought process that it takes to tell someone “You’re not as _____ as you think you are.”  Near as I can figure, comments like these have one or more of these subtexts:

  • “You need to be more like me.”
  • “I’m trying to save you wasting time or risking failure.”
  • “I have taken it upon myself to take you down a peg and put you in your place.”  (This one often appears with the phrase “I’m just saying…”)

Fortunately, none of these are valid, none of them need concern you.  You can, and should, ignore them.  Ignore them for your own sake, and for the sake of the awesome things you have in you to share with the world.

I wonder how many Jobs-level brains are out there but never flower because the person was told too many times that he (or more likely, she) isn’t as good as he thinks he is. Neil deGrasse Tyson makes a brilliant point about how we teach children, that parents spend the first years of a child’s life teaching him to walk and talk, and the rest of his life telling him to shut up and sit down, quashing their sense of wonder and thirst for knowledge. “You ain’t Steve Jobs” is the adult version of “shut up and sit down.”

Whatever your level of genius, one thing we can all share with Steve is his perseverance.  He kept working at what he believed in, despite public derision about his public failures.  Before the success of the Macintosh, Apple released the Lisa, and before the iPad, the Newton. How much poorer the world would be if Jobs had listened to his critics and packed it in!

I’m not saying that there isn’t value to be found in criticism, even unsolicited criticism, about your work.  I’m not suggesting that you shut out the world around you.  If you can take what you find useful and leave the rest, then do it.

I am suggesting that you shut out those who tell you you’re no good, or who want to put you in your place. When people tell you you’re not awesome, ignore them.  Who are they to say?  And why does it matter if they think you’re awesome or not?  Eventually, you’ll prove them wrong.

 

There’s only one useful way to handle your detractors

October 6, 2011 Open source, People, Social 8 comments , , ,

Here’s a Reddit/Slashdot/whatever thread that never happened:

Internet crank on Reddit: “Hey, Steve Jobs, I guess that new iPad looks cool, but I think iPad is a stupid name, it makes me think of sanitary napkins.”

Steve: “Yeah, well, here’s why we called it that. (Long explanation justifying his choices)”

Crank #2: “Well, why didn’t you call it the iTablet? I think that would have been a good name. What does everyone else think?”

Crank #3: “What does it have to be iAnything? I’m tired of the i- prefix.”

Steve: “We thought about that, but … (More explanation about his choices)”

Crank #1: “And really, isn’t it just a bigger iPod Touch? I would never carry that around with me. And come on, you’re just trying to redo the Newton anyway LOL”

Steve: “My logic behind the iPad is (vision, business plan, blah blah blah)”

Can you even  imagine Steve Jobs in this sort of time-wasting and emotionally draining tit-for-tat in a thread on Slashdot? On reddit? In some blog’s comment section? Of course not. Justification of his plans would take away from the amazing things that he needed to achieve.

Naysayers are part of every project. How many people do you think pissed on Jimmy Wales’ little project to aggregate knowledge? Nobody’s going to spend their time writing encyclopedia entries! And yet there it is.  On a personal level, if I listened to everyone who thought I was wasting my time improving on find + grep you’d never have ack.

We all have to persevere in the face of adversity to ideas, but there’s more than that.  We need to ignore our detractors. Despite how silly and time-wasting it is to argue your motivations and reasons for undertaking a project, many of us feel compelled to argue with everyone who disagrees with us.  I suggest you not waste your time.

On the Internet, the attitude is “Why wasn’t I consulted?” Every anti-social child (measured by calendar or maturity) with a keyboard thinks it’s his responsibility to piss on everything he doesn’t like. They’ll be there always. You can no more make them go away than you would by arguing with the rain.

What are you hoping to achieve by arguing with someone who doesn’t like your project? Do you expect that he’ll come around to your way of thinking? It won’t happen through words.

Not only does arguing with your critics waste your precious time, but it tells them, and every other crank reading, that you’re willing to engage in debate about what you’re doing. Don’t encourage them! Let them find a more receptive target.

I’m not saying that factual misstatements need to be ignored.  If something is provably incorrect, go ahead and counter it with facts.  However, most of the time these message thread pissing wars get down to “I would not be doing what you are doing, and therefore you are wrong for doing so.”

The only thing that has a chance of silencing your critics is success at what you do. Arguing with the naysayers doesn’t get you any closer to that.

Where to find me online

October 4, 2011 Internet, Social No comments , , , , , , , , , , ,

Although I mostly write to my blog and my Twitter feed, here’s a dump of most of my online presences.

petdance.com
My blog is where I post about technology and job hunting and careers.
@petdance on Twitter
My main outlet for posting short thoughts and links to interesting stuff. (I try not to engage in conversation on Twitter, because I think it’s annoying for everyone but the two people involved in the conversation.) If you were following @theworkinggeek or @techworklove on Twitter, switch to @petdance.
Perlbuzz
Perl news and the occasional original article. Most of the blog traffic is a weekly recap of the news bits posted to the @perlbuzz Twitter feed.
Facebook
I’ve whittled down my Facebook friend roster to mostly friends and family and people I know in day-to-day life. I’ve found that I’m not interested in the day-to-day lives of people I only know from the world of open source. Therefore, most of the friend requests I get from people I only know online get ignored.
Google+
I’m not sure how I’m going to wind up using Google+. Mostly I’ve been posting longer-form blurbs or embedding media.
Slideshare and Speakerdeck
I’ve always been posting slides of my talks on Slideshare, but Speakerdeck has just popped up and I like their interface much more, so I’ve put some content there, too. Look for Speakerdeck to gain more traction in the programming community.
LinkedIn
I have yet to have anything useful come out of LinkedIn, but I maintain a network there as well. My rule for adding someone as a contact on LinkedIn is that it has to be someone with whom I’ve actually worked on a project.
Github
Github is where I host most of my open source projects. Love love love.
Flickr and twitpic
I’m not at all a photographer, but there you go.

Did I forget one? Leave me a comment.

Distracting examples ruin your presentation

July 26, 2011 People, Social , , ,

At OSCON today, I went to a talk called “Why Know Algorithms” by Andrew Aksynoff. I was pleasantly surprised to see that the speaker was the author of Sphinx, a powerful full text indexing engine that I’m considering adopting for a project.

However, halfway through I was shocked, especially in light of all the problems with sexual harassment and sexist attitudes at conferences that have been brought to the fore lately, to see the example that Andrew used: Selecting women from a database, ranked by “hotness.”

Here’s the table layout he used (and I apologize for the blurriness):

CREATE TABLE usertest (
    id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY NULL,
    sex ENUM ('m','f'),
    age INTEGER NOT NULL,
    hotness INTEGER NOT NULL,
    name VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
    INDEX(sex,age,hotness)
)

His sample code revolved around ways to optimize this query:

SELECT *
FROM usertest
WHERE age >= 18 and age <= 25

The latter half of the talk discussed various ways of creating indexes to efficiently provide answers to that query, and which queries would run best with different indexes, in case you want to order by age instead of hotness, for example.

I was angry about two things. I’m specifically not going to address the crass sexism here. I know plenty of others can (and will) address it better than I can.

I was more upset about the effects of the sexism in the classroom. When I’m here at OSCON, I’m both teacher and student. When I’m a student at a session, I want to pay attention to the content, not wonder how the women in the audience feel about the instructor’s attitudes towards them. Are they offended, but afraid to leave? I saw no women leave, although plenty of men did.

Andrew clearly knew his material, and he explained it well. Strictly from a teaching perspective, Andrew’s problem was that the examples overshadowed the lessons to be taught. It’s the same frustration I had with Steven Feuerstein’s book from O’Reilly on Oracle 8 where his examples included a table of war criminals including Henry Kissinger.

When you’re teaching a class, don’t include anything that detracts from the message you’re trying to teach. A LOLcat slide is fine but include too many and that’s what people will remember rather than what you’re trying to teach. It should go without saying that examples that make the audience uncomfortable will also ruin your class.

Note: I will delete any comments that include personal attacks on anyone.

Six tips for preparing to attend a technical conference

July 21, 2011 Open source, Social 4 comments , , ,

I’ve been going to technical conferences since YAPC::NA 2002, and next week I’ll be at OSCON 2011 talking about community and Github. Preparation is important to getting the most out of the conference with the least amount of hassle. Here are some tips I’ve learned along the way.

Bring power tools

Power cord, display dongle, cube tap and business cards

Not electric drills and saws, but tools for getting power. Conference organizers may not have planned adequately for the influx of laptops, and electric outlets can be a rare commodity. If you’re flying to a conference, it can be especially difficult to find a plug at the airports. O’Hare in Chicago is especially bad.

If you can fit a power strip into your laptop bag, good. If you want to go cheap, go buy a cube tap at your hardware store for two dollars.

Make sure you bring your cell phone charger and a USB cable to hook up your phone to your laptop, too.

Label your stuff

If your forget your laptop power cord in a room, whoever finds it isn’t going to know whose it is. At the Apple-heavy conferences I usually attend, everyone’s cords all look the same anyway. Label it with your name and cell phone number. Same goes for anything else that you might use and lose, such as display adapter dongles. It’s frustratingly expensive to realize you lost a $25 piece of plastic.

Plan what you want to see

If you leave conference talk planning until the day of the talk, you’re more likely to miss seeing the really good stuff. Amidst all the talk in the hallways and hanging out in the exhibit halls and hackathons long lunches with new friends, it’s easy to forget about that one talk you really wanted to see until you look back on the schedule and realize it ended half an hour ago.

The OSCON scheduler makes it easy to mark the talks you want to see, but for the most important ones, I suggest adding them to your calendar on your phone and setting an alarm.

Bring business cards

You’re going to meet people, so give them something to remember you by. I’m talking about making your own business card, not your company business card. Your card need not be fancy, but if you can get a graphic designer friend to put together something nice in exchange for lunch and/or a few beers, so much the better. At the very least, you’ll want to include your name, website, email address and cell phone number. I also put my Twitter ID and Github ID on mine.

My box of 500 business cards was only about $20 delivered to my door. It’s fantastic bang for your buck for keeping in contact with the people you meet.

Get a laptop bag with a shoulder strap

While you’re at the conference, you’re going to take your laptop with you at all times. AT ALL TIMES. Every conference, someone gets a laptop stolen. You’re not going to let it be you.

Do not trust the guy next to you to “watch this while I run to the bathroom.” When you go to the bathroom, or grab a drink, or whatever it is that you do that isn’t seated at a conference table with your laptop in front of you, you’re going to have your laptop zipped up in your bag, with the strap over your shoulder. This goes double for airports.

Bathrooms are an ideal place for a thief to take your laptop. I assure you that standing at a urinal trying to take care of business with a laptop tucked under your arm is not fun. If you’re in a stall, be aware of how easy it is for a thief to grab a bag from under the stall, or from reaching over a door and taking the laptop from the hook.

A laptop bag with a shoulder strap is the only way to go.

Clean your house

Wash the dishes. Empty the garbage. Take stuff out of the fridge if it’s going to go bad in your absence. A lot of nastiness can happen in five days.

Other tips

I asked on Twitter for suggestions for conference prep. Some replies:

  • Give a practice session of any talk that I haven’t given before. — @mjdominus
  • Make a checklist of all cables I need. Then research where to buy them in Portland just in case. — @rjbs
  • Get a lot of sleep the week before. — @adamturoff

What suggestions do you have? Please leave them in the comments below.

Job ads to avoid

February 18, 2011 Career, Job hunting, Social No comments

I came across an ad for programmers the other day, and one of the requirements was that you be able to:

Get along well with other sometimes mal-adjusted geeks

The way I read this is “some of the other people are anti-social assholes, and we, as a company, are OK with that,” probably because they are able to turn out code and they’d rather not deal with the long-term effects of such people on a team.

Having worked for such a company before, I suggest that life is too short to work at them, regardless of how cool the job may be otherwise.